Help Prevent Your Poodle From Getting Cancer

poodle health

Don't Let Your Poodle Get Cancer

If you are interested in learning how you can Help Prevent Your Poodle From Getting Cancer, you should pay close attention to this article with some important tips on preventing Cancer for your pet. As it is with humans, an early detection may be the most important factor in saving your poodle’s life. There are a list of things you should take note of that could be warning signs that you should bring to the attention of your veterinarian right away. Take a moment to go over this list of possible symptoms of cancer from this article about how to Help Prevent Your Poodle From Getting Cancer.

Update:  New way to help prevent your poodle from getting Cancer

Hi everyone – Adam here. I was reading through some of the most popular posts on the blog, and I realized I did not tell you about my favorite ebooks on keeping your dog healthy.
My friend  Andrew Lewis has put together a wonderful package that can help you extend your poodle’s in a simple and easy way. There is too much to tell you about on this page, but click on the blue link, or just click the play button on the video just below about Dog Food Secrets, and you can learn more about it.

Click Here!

 

I write this week’s column with a heavy heart. A close friend’s dog was diagnosed with prostate cancer and died this past week. The veterinarian told her that prostate cancer in dogs is rare, but unfortunately, it’s usually an aggressive cancer. It most likely occurs in dogs who have not been neutered. Her dog was neutered at the shelter where she adopted him, but there could have been complications with the procedure.

According to the Morris Animal Foundation, half of all dogs will develop cancer during their lifetime and one in four will die of the disease. Early detection is the best tactic for fighting the disease.

So what are the signs that pet parents need to look for? The American Veterinary Medical Association lists these symptoms as ones to discuss with your veterinarian:

1. Abnormal swellings that persist.

2. Sores that do not heal.

3. Weight loss.

4. Loss of appetite.

5. Abnormal bleeding or discharge.

6. Bad breath.

7. Difficulty eating or swallowing.

8. Loss of stamina.

9. Limping or persistent stiffness.

10. Difficulty breathing, urinating or defacating.

Large breeds, such as Great Danes or St. Bernards, and dogs seven years and older are more prone to bone cancers. If your dog starts to limp or walk differently, don’t assume that it’s arthritis and have your veterinarian examine your dog. Our 13-year-old Australian shepherd/Lab mix dog developed bone cancer and the first symptom was limping.

The American Society For The Prevention And Cruelty To Animals (ASPCA) has these tips for reducing your dog’s risk of developing cancer.

• Spay your female pet before she’s one year old to greatly reduce the risk of breast, ovarian and uterine cancers and neuter your male dog to reduce the risk of testicular cancer.

• Have any masses on your dog’s skin examined by your veterinarian and if it’s cancerous, have it removed as soon as possible.

• Don’t allow your pet to be exposed to cigarette smoke.

• Use pet-formulated sunscreen on vulnerable, fair-skinned pets.

• Avoid chemical lawn products, which are proven to cause cancers in pets, including bladder cancer and lymphoma.

Many times, these symptoms go unnoticed and too many pets can become victims of cancer or the cancer is not caught up and dealt with early enough. If you notice any of these symptoms in your poodle, make sure you call your veterinarian so you have a chance at nipping it in the bud, before it gets any worse. I am happy to share this article about things that can Help Prevent Your Poodle From Getting Cancer.

Please share this with anyone you know who has a pet poodle or a dog of any breed as this information could possible make a difference in saving your pet’s life.

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Comments

  1. Amanda says:

    Thanks for the great info here Adam. I am really surprised about the loophole on preservatives in the dog food. I’m really hopeful that there are laws in my country that doesn’t allow this yucky stuff into the food chain. Though I doubt it as there is all sorts of stuff in our (human) food as well.

  2. LuLu says:

    I so agree with avoiding commercial pet food. My dalmatian gets a balanced raw food diet. Time consuming but her health is amazing!

    • admin says:

      You sound like me! My wife and I have been giving our poodle and our two cats a raw diet along with some very high quality
      select pet formulas and some supplements. It is worth the extra time and bother. We do love our pets, don’t we!??

  3. My dog is getting pretty old and recently has been doing a few weird things that look like she is in a prolonged seizure. Afterwards she is ok. We will see the vet soon but I do not foresee putting her down because of this as she seems fine afterwards.

    • admin says:

      That does sound odd. Our dog seems to get these wheezing attacks but then she is fine.
      Sounds like we both need a visit to the vet!

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